Bath Salts Intoxication

Bath salts drugs should not be confused with Epsom salts, which people use in their bathwater. Rather, bath salts are dangerous manmade drugs. Teens, college students, and young adults commonly use bath salts at clubs and raves, because they enhance energy and alertness. Moreover, they can create feelings of euphoria and enhanced sociability and sex drive. A 2015 study of US teenagers found that one in 100 high school seniors used bath salts. Furthermore, a fifth of those who tried the drug became frequent users.

Autism

Autism spectrum disorder is 4.5 times more common among boys than among girls. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, around one in 68 children is identified as being on the autism spectrum, ranging from Asperger’s Syndrome to severe autism.

Atypical Depression

Atypical depression is one category of depression. What’s happening in a person’s life strongly affects atypical depression and its symptoms. These might be major life events, such as graduating, moving, or a breakup—or they could be small positive or negative events. Atypical depression is actually very common among teens: Some three million adolescents have at least one major depressive episode annually.

Attachment-Based Family Therapy

Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is heavily influenced by John Bowlby’s attachment theory. This posits that humans have an inherent, biological desire for meaningful relationships. Guy Diamond, Gary Diamond, and Suzanne Levy defined the parameters of attachment family therapy in their book Attachment-Based Family Therapy for Depressed Adolescents. Attachment therapy is a proven methodology for using family relationships to treat depression and prevent suicide in adolescents.

Attachment Disorder

Attachment disorder can influence maladaptive behaviors. The most significant relationship in shaping mental health is the relationship formed between children and their primary caregiver(s). These relationships, to a large degree, determine who we will be as adults. Adolescents who did not have securely attached relationships as infants and children may suffer from attachment disorder. Attachment disorder in teenagers often manifests as low self-esteem, depression, and anxiety, which can lead to self-destructive behaviors such as substance use, promiscuity, eating disorders, and cutting.

Art Therapy

Art therapy can be particularly effective with teenagers who tend to view art-making activities as a nonthreatening form of clinical treatment. Teens tend to be attracted to making symbols and graphic images. Consequently, they often enjoy expressing meaning in nonverbal ways. Through this visual expression, an art therapist gains insight into the challenges a teenager faces, particularly situations that feel taboo or too embarrassing for word

Anxiety Attacks

An anxiety attack is a behavioral manifestation of an anxiety disorder. Teens often have anxiety attacks that are different from panic attacks. Unlike panic attacks, anxiety attacks are reactions to external stressors.

Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia nervosa has the highest death rate of any mental illness, including all other eating disorders. Although anorexia nervosa mainly affects girls and women, boys and men also suffer from anorexia. However, teens with anorexia nervosa may not admit that they are suffering from an intense fear of gaining weight.

Anger Issues

Anger in teenagers can be a normal part of maturing, and it can also be a signal that something is wrong. Teen anger may take the form of resentment, rebellion, or withdrawal. For adolescents, anger can be a sign of underlying trauma, abuse, depression, anxiety, grief, or substance abuse.

Adventure Therapy

Adventure therapy is an experiential therapeutic approach that uses challenges in the outdoors as a tool for change. Influenced by the Outward Bound program founded by Kurt Hahn in 1941, adventure therapy programming emerged in the late 1980s. The principle is that placing youth in natural settings to undertake challenging tasks could lead to positive therapeutic results. And teen adventure therapy proves this to be true time and again.

Adjustment Disorder

Adjustment disorder can impact adolescents. It’s natural for teenagers to have some degree of difficulty adjusting to big changes in their life. But when a teenager responds to a stressful event by displaying symptoms of depression —such as hopelessness and loss of interest in activities they used to enjoy—over an extended period of time, this is known as adjustment disorder. Other names for this condition are “stress response syndrome,” “transitional disorder,” and “situational depression.”

ADHD

ADHD is an acronym that stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. As it is one of the most commonly diagnosed disorders, many adolescents have been given a teen ADHD diagnosis. Since ADHD symptoms often vary from case to case, misdiagnosis of ADHD in children is widespread.

Addiction

Addiction is a chronic disease that afflicts people of all ages. More than 5 million American adolescents suffer from addiction, in the form of a substance or alcohol use disorder. Through the help of an addiction counselor, teens suffering from addiction can find sustainable addiction recovery.

Adderall Abuse

Adderall abuse is the use of the prescription medication for non-medical purposes. Given the energizing properties of the prescription stimulant, the drug is often abused by users, especially students. Therefore, Adderall abuse is common among young people because the drug is widely prescribed.

Acute Stress Disorder

Acute stress disorder is more persistent and much more intense than the routine stress that many teenagers experience. Unlike everyday stress about schoolwork or social interactions, acute stress disorder is an overwhelming reaction to a specific traumatic event. Examples of such traumatic events include being in a serious accident or witnessing a death. The resonant power of such an acute stressor can disrupt a teenager’s sense of well-being.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT therapy) is based on a psychological theory of human language. A 2015 review found that ACT techniques worked better than either a placebo or typical treatment for anxiety, depression, and addiction. Developed to address the challenges of mental health issues, ACT techniques focus on reducing avoidant coping styles.